July 10

Creating social media posts

 

creating social media posts large

The four categories of focus for a RAFT include:

  • Role of the Writer: Who are you as the writer? A movie star? The President? A plant?
  • Audience: To whom are you writing? A senator?  Yourself? A company?
  • Format: In what format are you writing? A diary entry? A newspaper?  A love letter?
  • Topic: What are you writing about?

Discuss with students the importance of considering each element — role, audience, format, and topic — before they begin writing. For example, taking on the wrong role can dramatically affect the response. If a student is supposed to write from the point of view of a flighty teen, but writes instead from the point of view of the strict mother, their RAFT writing would not be accurate because it came from the wrong point of view.

Instead sharing the usual boring biographical research results for a famous historian or scientists, have students imagine what would be on their phone. Have them step into the shoes of their research topic and identify some of the apps, games, pictures, text messages and emails that would be found on his/her phone.

THEIR phone

Think about how well they need to know a character to be able to build a social media profile and posts. Either have them recreate a phone, create a social media profile and posts or just have them to identify the following:

1. Screen Name:They should be creative and use what they know about the character. Have them try to think outside the box.

2. Avatar: Their avatar should be an image or photo that represents the text’s character / author / ?? .

3. Quote: Twitter and Facebook users can identify or pin a favorite quote, song lyric or personal sound byte.

4. Playlist: Consider what songs might be on their phone.

5. Contacts: What people would be on their friends list: they can use real people, historical people, or fictional characters.

 

July 10

creating videos

creating videos lrg

Before your students can tell their story, they need to outline it so that they can identify the key points. Provide them with a Plot Diagram Tool or storyboard so that they can record the events and establish their place in the narrative structure.

There is no need to outline the entire story at first. Make sure that they have recorded enough details to ensure that they have relayed the most important facts, events actions.

When they complete their planning diagrams and outlines, they should begin the work of composing their scripts by identifying the events and actions that are important to their dramatization.

Common Core State Standards alignment:

CCSS.ELA-Reading.1
Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.

CCSS.ELA-Reading.2
Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.

CCSS.ELA-Reading.3
Analyze how and why individuals, events, or ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

CCSS.ELA-Reading.4
Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

CCSS.ELA-Reading.5
Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole.

CCSS.ELA-Reading.7
Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.1

CCSS.ELA-Reading.8
Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence.

CCSS.ELA-Writing.3
Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details and well-structured event sequences.

CCSS.ELA- Writing.4
Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

CCSS.ELA-Writing.7
Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

CCSS.ELA-Writing.8
Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.

CCSS.ELA-Speaking and Listening.1
Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

July 10

Creating engaging summaries

creating engaging summaries gif

Summarizing requires students to determine what is important in the text. Paraphrasing requires them to translate the text into their own words. Manipulating the text helps students remember what they read because it requires them to:

  • Identify or generate main ideas
  • Connect the main or central ideas
  • Eliminate unnecessary information
July 10

Creating Interactive Images

creating interactive imagesAfter students read text have them create memes or gifs regarding the themes, characters, main ideas, concepts, etc.  They use critical thinking skills to find ways to create the parodies/associations.

Here are some How To slides to help you and your students create artifacts.

Students can create memes or gifs in any of their classes. It’s not just limited to English class.

Math or Science

  • Highlight an important inventor, mathematician or scientist and publish a quote or relevant biographical information.
  • Demonstrate measurement, angle, and percentage concepts.
  • Create a riddle or question for a mathematician or scientist.
  • Summarize the main idea of a text over a snapshot of a book’s cover.

Social Studies

  • Illustrate a region’s strengths, weaknesses, geographical markers, etc.
  • Highlight an important historian and publish a quote or relevant biographical information.
  • Promote political figures.
  • Debate controversial issues

Create a slideshow, assign students slides and have them to paste their memes on their slides.

Many CCSS anchor standards are addressed when students create interactive images.

CCSS.ELA.Reading.1
Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA.Reading.2
Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
CCSS.ELA.Reading.4
Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.
CCSS.ELA.Reading.7
Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words
CCSS.ELA.Writing.2
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
CCSS.ELA.Writing.4
Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
CCSS.ELA.Writing.5
Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach.
CCSS.ELA.Writing.7
Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
CCSS.ELA.Writing.8
Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism.
CCSS.ELA.SpeakListen.1
Prepare for and participate effectively in a range of conversations and collaborations with diverse partners, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
CCSS.ELA.SpeakListen.2
Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.
CCSS.ELA.SpeakListen.3
Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric.

CCSS.ELA.SpeakListen.4
Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

CCSS.ELA.SpeakListen.5
Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance understanding of presentations.

CCSS.ELA.Language.5
Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
CCSS.ELA.Language.6
Acquire and use accurately a range of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening
December 31

Group Responses – way to TEACHtheTEST

How do we Teach the Test without really teaching the test?

Question for the ages! !!

How do we?  

I dunno????

What I feel intuitively as a Professional Educator is that

YES, our students will benefit from exposure to testing environments : timed (or untimed with focus), textual rigor, test format, etc.

NO, our students will not benefit from taking 1 test,  2 test,  3 test,  and more. That is NOT going to help our SCHOLARS.

YES, there is way to teach a / ‘The’ test without really TEACHING THE TEST.

H O W !!  You may ask (as do I by the way)

I know that if we stimulate our Scholars, they can read, comprehend and discuss complex texts.

They can.

They can do this if I allow them the opportunity to explore and analyze text in an unthreatening manner.

Hmmmmm….  What ? How?

I dunno. It is my goal that my Scholars will be able to read, relate, revise, present, dissect, remash, publish, discuss and  record the written, visuaL and oral texts that they will be examining.

Step one: How do we eliminate the threat of failure when we ask our Scholars to read and respond?

The only way that they can do any of this is if they feel comfortable enough to share and engage.

They often feel too uncomfortable to respond and if we are going to have a class that is student driven, their has to be student contribution.

Group Responses are often a way to lessen the threat of openly failing. Failing is a part of learning but it is more palpable to possibly fail in front of a few and not many.

image

Take a TEST (a cold read selection with multiple choice questions and a written response component) and have them complete an individual testing session before they get into learning communities to share answers and select the group’s Best Answer. Their Group Answer can be recorded on mini whiteboard, via Kahoot response, Google Doc,  worksheet, etc.

Playing Kahoot

Playing Kahoot

Object of the activity is to individually take test, discuss answers with others and then get immediate confirmation and feedback for answer choices.

Group response worksheet

Group response worksheet

Posted from Edublogs for Android as I sit and wait in COX CABLE!! 

More to come.

Will check back in soon. ♡♡♡